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New Grads: 10 Goals for Your First 5,000 Hours on the Job

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If you’re lucky enough to be starting a job—a real, career-building job—after you graduate, you probably aren’t thinking of when it will end.

But the reality is that few people keep their first jobs for long. The average person stays in a job around 4.5 years these days according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but this number is lower for younger people—only 13 percent of 30-34 year olds have been with their current employer for 10 years, the BLS reports. The more common story is that people find other opportunities, travel, go to graduate school and so forth.

So let’s say you’ll stay at that first job for two years. Let’s say you’re also planning on devoting a lot of time to work—maybe 50 hours per week (far more than the average worker puts in). That gives you roughly 2,500 hours per year, or 5,000 work hours over your two-year tenure.

That’s a lot of time, but it’s also a finite amount of time, and easy to let slip through your fingers. A weekly two-hour meeting that you sleepwalk through will eat up 200 of those 5,000 hours, with little to show for it.

So a better approach is to ask yourself what you hope to do with those 5,000 hours. What would you like to learn? Who would you like to meet? What can you do to position yourself well for the next 40 years of your career?

Here’s a checklist of 10 things you might want to take away from those first 5,000 hours, regardless of what your actual job entails:

paid to learn quote

1. A portfolio

Manage your time so you leave with a few examples of work you’re proud of that you can point to and say “I did that.” In particular, results that can be measured get noticed.

2. Real colleagues

Manage your relationships so that at least a few of your immediate coworkers would like to work with you should your paths meet again (which they probably will, as the corporate world can come to resemble a revolving door).

3. Mentors

Outperform expectations so well that at least three people higher up in the hierarchy not only answer your emails, but like you and will vouch for your competence.

4. Skills

A job is a chance to get paid to learn. Try to leave with an in-demand skill or two that you knew little about coming in.

5. A network

Meet at least 10 people outside your company at industry events and keep in touch with them regularly. These people are likely the key to landing your next job.

6. Good karma

A volunteer gig in an industry organization introduces you to people who can see that you’re eager to help—so they’re likely to help you.

7. A career map

Have lunch with people of lots of different tenures so you develop a good sense of your industry and a good sense of the career paths associated with it. This may keep you from earning a degree that doesn’t actually help you reach your goals.

8. Self-awareness

Success requires knowledge of the kinds of projects you do well, the kinds you need to work on and the mistakes you have a tendency to make again and again.

9. Good time management habits

Not many people have the ability to make steady progress toward future deadlines and the discipline to say no to distractions so you can say yes to things you want more. People who do tend to soar.

10. Assets

If your employer offers a retirement account (like a 401k), be sure to set it up and fund it well enough to get any matching funds. If you earn decent returns, any money you stash away now will be worth a mint when you retire. You’ll thank yourself later.

What do you plan to take away from your first 5,000 hours on the job?

Laura Vanderkam is the author of What the Most Successful People Do at Work (Portfolio, April 23, 2013) and 168 Hours: You Have More Time Than You Think (Portfolio, 2010).

Brazen powers real-time, online events for leading organizations around the world. Our lifestyle and career blog, Brazen Life, offers fun and edgy ideas for ambitious professionals navigating the changing world of work.

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  • http://twitter.com/InterviewSucess Interview Success

    Awesome tips! Another to add: Hone your personal story. Understand what makes you unique, why you’re a great professional, and how you can translate these assets to others. For instance, if you keep track of all the accomplishments you’ve made on the job, it can add some substance to your personal story. This can assist you in networking events, with coworkers, and of course, in job interviews should you have one in the future.

  • http://www.tonygoddardconsulting.com/ Tony Goddard

    Hi Laura
    These are a great set of tips for anybody starting work. One thing that might be worth adding (or making more explicit) is to keep a list of all your accomplishments. In particular keep a note of any relevant numbers such as sales, costs, profit, number of people etc. This will really help when applying for job numbers 3 and 4. I find that many of the people I work with have a real problem remembering all the great things they achieved

    Tony

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